WSAZ - Blogs - At the Capitol

June 15, 2011- Movement on Marcellus?

By: Michael Hyland
By: Michael Hyland

After a legislative session that resulted in no major regulatory bill for the vast Marcellus Shale natural gas reserve, a group of West Virginia lawmakers is going to attempt a compromise measure.

After a legislative session that resulted in no major regulatory bill for the vast Marcellus Shale natural gas reserve, a group of West Virginia lawmakers is going to attempt a compromise measure.

There's been speculation for months about whether the Legislature would have to devote a special session to dealing with the issue. Senate President Earl Ray Tomblin, who is acting as governor, told me last week he's debating calling lawmakers back to Charleston in early August to tackle both redistricting and the Marcellus Shale.

One complaint lawmakers had during the regular winter session was that they felt tackling such a complicated, complex issue would require their sole focus. Legislators are being lobbied by a wide array of concerned players, including businesses, land owners, environmental groups and many more.

Some of the main concerns have been potential impacts to drinking water, damage to roads by vehicles and other equipment, fees for new drilling licenses, the need for more state inspectors and so on.

The Associated Press published the following after a committee meeting during the last day of the June interim legislative session:

CHARLESTON, W.Va. (AP) - West Virginia's Legislature is revisiting the thorny topic of new rules and permit fees for the state's Marcellus Shale natural gas field.

 

 

The Joint Committee on Government and Finance agreed Wednesday to assign a panel of lawmakers to seek a compromise measure on the subject. The joint committee is made up of the House and Senate's top leaders from both parties.

 

 

The Marcellus shale field is believed to hold a vast reserve of natural gas. But tapping it can involve an expensive and water-intensive drilling and extraction process.

 

 

Lawmakers debated proposed regulations throughout this year's regular session. Those efforts failed amid industry objections to provisions addressing environmental concerns and surface owner rights.

 

Acting Gov. Earl Ray Tomblin has questioned convening a special session in the absence of consensus among lawmakers.

Read More Blogs
Comments are posted from viewers like you and do not always reflect the views of this station.
powered by Disqus
WSAZ NewsChannel 3 645 Fifth Avenue Huntington, WV 25701 304-697-4780 WSAZ Charleston 111 Columbia Avenue Charleston, WV 25302 304-344-3521
Gray Television, Inc. - Copyright © 2002-2014 - Designed by Gray Digital Media - Powered by Clickability