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Hurricane Safety

Hurricanes
A hurricane is a type of tropical cyclone, the general term for all circulating weather systems over tropical waters (counterclockwise in the Northern Hemisphere). Tropical cyclones are classified as follows:

Tropical Depression: An organized system of clouds and thunderstorms with a defined circulation and maximum sustained winds of 38 mph (33 knots) or less.
Tropical Storm: An organized system of strong thunderstorms with a defined circulation and maximum sustained winds of 39 to 73 mph (34-63 knots).
Hurricane: An intense tropical weather system with a well-defined circulation and maximum sustained winds of 74 mph (64 knots) or higher. In the western Pacific, hurricanes are called "typhoons," and similar storms in the Indian Ocean are called "cyclones."

Hurricanes are products of a tropical ocean and atmosphere. Powered by heat from the sea, they are steered by the easterly trade winds and the temperate westerlies as well as by their own ferocious energy. Around their core, winds grow with great velocity, generating violent seas. Moving ashore, they sweep the ocean inward while spawning tornadoes and producing torrential rains and floods. Each year, on average, 10 tropical storms, of which six become hurricanes, develop over the Atlantic Ocean, Caribbean Sea, or Gulf of Mexico. Many of these remain over the ocean; however, about five hurricanes strike the United States coastline every three years. Of these five, two will be major hurricanes, category 3 or greater on the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Scale.

Breeding Grounds
In the eastern Pacific, hurricanes start forming by mid-May. In the Atlantic, Caribbean, and Gulf of Mexico, hurricanes season starts in June. For the United States, peak hurricane threat exists from mid-August to late October although the official hurricane season extends through November. Over other parts of the world, such as the western Pacific, hurricanes can occur year-round.

Storm Structure
The process by which a disturbance forms and subsequently strengthens into a hurricane depends on at least three conditions. Warm waters and moisture are mentioned above. The third condition is a wind pattern near the ocean surface that spirals air inward. Bands of thunderstorms form, allowing the air to warm further and rise higher into the atmosphere. If the winds at these higher levels are relatively light, this structure can remain intact and allow for additional strengthening.

The center, or eye, of a hurricane is relatively calm. The most violent activity takes place in the area immediately around the eye, called the eyewall. At the top of the eyewall (about 50,000 feet), most of the air is propelled outward, increasing the air's upward motion. Some of the air, however, moves inward and sinks into the eye, creating a cloud-free area.

The Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Scale
The Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Scale is a 1-5 rating based on the hurricane's present intensity. This is used to give an estimate of the potential property damage and flooding expected along the coast from a hurricane landfall. Wind speed is the determining factor in the scale, as storm surge values are highly dependent on the slope of the continental shelf and the shape of the coastline, in the landfall region. Note that all winds are using the U.S. 1-minute average.

Category One Hurricane: Winds 74-95 mph (64-82 kt). Storm surge generally 4-5 ft
No real damage to building structures. Damage primarily to unanchored mobile homes, shrubbery, and trees. Some damage to poorly constructed signs. Also, some coastal road flooding and minor pier damage.
Category Two Hurricane: Winds 96-110 mph (83-95 kt). Storm surge generally 6-8 feet
Some roofing material, door, and window damage of buildings. Considerable damage to shrubbery and trees with some trees blown down. Considerable damage to mobile homes, poorly constructed signs, and piers.
Category Three Hurricane: Winds 111-130 mph (96-113 kt). Storm surge generally 9-12 ft Some structural damage to small residences and utility buildings with a minor amount of curtainwall failures. Damage to shrubbery and trees with foliage blown off trees and large trees blown down. Mobile homes and poorly constructed signs are destroyed.
Category Four Hurricane: Winds 131-155 mph (114-135 kt). Storm surge generally 13-18 ft More extensive curtainwall failures with some complete roof structure failures on small residences. Shrubs, trees, and all signs are blown down. Complete destruction of mobile homes. Extensive damage to doors and windows.
Category Five Hurricane: Winds > 155 mph (135 kt). Storm surge generally > 18 ft
Complete roof failure on many residences and industrial buildings. Some complete building failures with small utility buildings blown over or away. All shrubs, trees, and signs blown down. Complete destruction of mobile homes. Severe and extensive window and door damage.

Hurricane Damage
Storm Surge
Storm surge is a large dome of water often 50 to 100 miles wide that sweeps across the coastline near where a hurricane makes landfall. The surge of high water topped by waves is devastating. The stronger the hurricane and the shallower the offshore water, the higher the surge will be. Along the immediate coast, storm surge is the greatest threat to life and property.

Storm Tide
If the storm surge arrives at the same time as the high tide, the water height will be even greater. The storm tide is the combination of the storm surge and the normal astronomical tide.

Winds
Hurricane-force winds, 74 mph or more, can destroy poorly constructed buildings and mobile homes. Debris, such as signs, roofing material, siding, and small items left outside, become flying missiles in hurricanes. Winds often stay above hurricane strength well inland.

Heavy Rains/Floods
Widespread torrential rains often in excess of 6 inches can produce deadly and destructive floods. This is the major threat to areas well inland.

Tornadoes
Hurricanes also produce tornadoes, which add to the hurricane's destructive power. These tornadoes most often occur in thunderstorms embedded in rain bands well away from the center of the hurricane. However, they can also occur near the eyewall.

Hurricane Safety
During the Storm
When in a Watch Area:

  • Frequently listen to radio, TV, or NOAA Weather Radio for official bulletins of the storm's progress.
  • Fuel and service family vehicles.
  • Inspect and secure mobile home tie downs. Prepare to cover all window and door openings with shutters or other shielding materials.
  • Check batteries and stock up on canned food, first aid supplies, drinking water, and medications. Have on hand an extra supply of cash.
  • Prepare to bring inside lawn furniture and other loose, light-weight objects, such as garbage cans, garden tools, etc.

When in a Warning Area:

  • Closely monitor radio, TV, or NOAA Weather Radio for official bulletins.
  • Complete preparation activities, such as putting up storm shutters, storing loose objects, etc. Follow instructions issued by local officials. Leave immediately if told to do so!
  • Only stay in a home if you have NOT been ordered to leave. Stay inside a well constructed building.
  • Turn refrigerator to maximum cold and open only when necessary. Turn off utilities if told to do so by authorities. Turn off propane tanks. Unplug small appliances.
  • Fill bathtub and large containers with water for sanitary purposes.
  • Stay away from windows and doors even if they are covered. Take refuge in a small interior room, closet, or hallway. Close all interior doors.

After the Storm

  • Keep listening to radio, TV, or NOAA Weather Radio.
  • Wait until an area is declared safe before entering. Roads may be closed for your protection. If you come upon a barricade or a flooded road, turn around and go another way!
  • Avoid weakened bridges and washed out roads. Do not drive into flooded areas. Stay on firm ground. Moving water only 6 inches deep can sweep you off your feet.
  • Do not drink or prepare food with tap water until you are certain it is not contaminated.

For this and more information visit the National Hurricane Center at www.nhc.noaa.gov or the National Weather Service at www.nws.noaa.gov


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