UPDATE: 'Emmaleigh's Law' signed into law

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UPDATE 4/19/17 @ 10:35 a.m.
CHARLESTON, W.Va (WSAZ) -- Emmaleigh's Law has officially become law in West Virginia.

West Virginia Governor Jim Justice signed Senate Bill 288 Tuesday.

Emmaleigh's Law increases the penalty for a person convicted for child abuse causing death from 10-40 years in jail to up to 15 years to life.

It's named after 10-month-old Emmaleigh Barringer who died in October 2016 from a skull fracture.

Benjamin Taylor was charged with first degree sexual assault in the case. The charges were upgraded to murder after Emmaleigh died.

Emmaleigh's Law will go into effect 90 days from the time it was passed.



UPDATE 4/7/17 @ 12:30 p.m.
CHARLESTON, W.Va. (WSAZ) – A bill that would increase the penalty for child abuse and neglect will head to Governor Jim Justice's desk for approval.

Senate Bill 288, also known as "Emmaleigh's Law," was passed by the House of Delegates Friday.

The bill would increase the penalty for a person convicted for child abuse causing death from 10-40 years in jail to up to 15 years to life.

The bill is named after 10-month-old Emmaleigh Barringer who died in October 2016 from a skull fracture.



UPDATE 3/22/17 @ 12:15 p.m.
CHARLESTON, W.Va. (WSAZ) – A bill that would increase the penalty for child abuse and neglect has passed the West Virginia Senate.

Senate Bill 288, also known as "Emmaleigh's Law," was passed by the Senate Wednesday.

The bill would increase the penalty for a person convicted for child abuse causing death from 10-40 years in jail to up to 15 years to life.

The bill is named after 10-month-old Emmaleigh Barringer who died in October 2016 from a skull fracture.

Benjamin Taylor was charged with first degree sexual assault in the case. The charges were upgraded to murder after Emmaleigh died.

The bill will now go to the House for approval.



ORIGINAL STORY 3/17/17
CHARLESTON, W.Va. (WSAZ) – “Emmaleigh’s law,” a bill that would double the charges for various child abuse penalties, was approved Friday by the Senate Judiciary Committee.

It is named after a 10-month-old baby who died last October from a skull fracture after being sexually assaulted.

Benjamin Taylor was charged with murder, sexual assault and child abuse in that case.

If passed, the bill would amend the penalties for a person convicted of death of a child by a parent, guardian or custodian from the current 10 to 40 years up to 20 to 80 years.

It also would increase the penalty of child abuse to two to 10 years.

The bill now heads to the full Senate for approval.



 
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