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First indictments coming Monday in federal Russian election tampering case

(WEAU)
Published: Oct. 29, 2017 at 4:06 PM EDT
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As soon as tomorrow, anyone charged in connection with an investigation into Russian meddling in the 2016 election could be taken into custody. A federal grand jury in Washington approved the first charges Friday in the investigation led by special counsel Robert Mueller, according to CNN.

It is still unclear what the charges are as they are still sealed under orders from a federal judge.

Robert Mueller was appointed in May of this year as the leader of the investigation, shortly after then-FBI Director James Comey was fired by President Donald Trump. Comey had originally opened the investigation in July 2016 while the presidential campaign was already underway.

According to orders, Mueller is authorized to investigate "any matters that arose or may arise directly from the investigation”.

The special counsel's investigation has focused on potential collusion between the Trump campaign and Russia, as well as obstruction of justice by the President, who might have tried to impede the investigation. CNN reported that investigators are scrutinizing Trump and his associates' financial ties to Russia.

Mueller's team has also examined foreign lobbying conducted by former Trump campaign chairman Paul Manafort, former national security adviser Michael Flynn and others. His team has issued subpoenas for documents and testimony to a handful of figures, including some people close to Manafort, and others involved in the Trump Tower meeting between Russians and campaign officials.

Last year, the Comey-led investigation secured approval from the secret court that oversees the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act to monitor the communications of Manafort, as well as former Trump campaign adviser Carter Page, as part of the investigation into Russian meddling.

In addition to Mueller's probe, three committees on Capitol Hill are conducting their own investigations.