Flood Watch assessed for the overnight

A Flash Flood Watch, as issued by the National Weather Service, remains valid overnight as soaking rains will be hanging around until just after sunrise Thursday.

HUNTINGTON/CHARLESTON, W.Va. (WSAZ) --

  • Overnight rains spell local high water
  • Rivers hold their own…minor spillage
  • Frigid with flurries on Valentine’s Day

Late this Wednesday evening, gusty squalls armed with a brief burst of 30-40 mph winds, quick moving downpours and a sudden half inch of rain were passing. The strength of these winds are capable of a few flickers on your TV screen and perhaps some minor tree branch tumble. Given the short duration of the squall, fingers crossed the effects will be muted.

Now the Flash Flood Watch, as issued by the National Weather Service, remains valid overnight as soaking rains will be hanging around until just after sunrise. Total night time rains will average an inch. Falling over a 6-8 hour time slot, those rains will create some problems on rural winding roads that run along small streams. For this reason, we have a handful of schools that are delaying the start of the new day.

Meanwhile a close inspection of the hydrographs from the National Weather Service show that our rivers will rise in response to these rains. Still the lack of daytime Wednesday accumulations suggest that major flood conditions are unlikely.

However, interests along southern Rivers including the Greenbrier, New, Tug, Coal, Guyandotte and Big Sandy will need to monitor water level rises. Many low-lying dips on roads adjacent to these streams will be fair game for spillage and possible road closures. Strawberry, Coal River and Ferrell Roads along the Coal River are notorious hot spots in cases like this.

Finally temperatures will be tumbling through the 40s into the 30s from dawn until dusk and that will set us up for some snow flurry and squall action on Thursday night into Friday when a Valentine’s morning dusting of snow is likely.